Clinical Curriculum

PGY1

The first year is focused on getting interns integrated into residency. The year begins with an orientation month where residents undergo ACLS/ATLS/PALS training as well as several procedural workshops led by ED faculty including suturing, central venous access, and basic and advanced airway. Clinically this year highlights common emergency department chief complaints/diagnoses, as well as associated management and dispositions. Additionally, a significant amount of time is spent teaching residents frequently used ED procedures including point-of-care ultrasound and orthopaedic reductions.

PGY2

This year focuses on care of the complex patient. In addition to being in the ED, residents spend time in multiple ICUs to help develop essential skills required to manage critically ill patients. Attention is also dedicated to improving diagnostic and procedural skills in common but more challenging ED complaints.

PGY3

This year prepares residents for independent practice by training them to be able to “run the ED” themselves, in addition to encouraging leadership both inside and outside the ED. Patient flow as well as patient metrics are emphasized. Clinically, residents sharpen their acumen in recognizing when patients don’t “fit into a box,” and develop advanced skills in the management of critically ill patients.

PGY1

The first year is focused on getting interns integrated into residency. The year begins with an orientation month where residents undergo ACLS/ATLS/PALS training as well as several procedural workshops led by ED faculty including suturing, central venous access, and basic and advanced airway. Clinically this year highlights common emergency department chief complaints/diagnoses, as well as associated management and dispositions. Additionally, a significant amount of time is spent teaching residents frequently used ED procedures including point-of-care ultrasound and orthopaedic reductions.

PGY2

This year focuses on care of the complex patient. In addition to being in the ED, residents spend time in multiple ICUs to help develop essential skills required to manage critically ill patients. Attention is also dedicated to improving diagnostic and procedural skills in common but more challenging ED complaints.

PGY3

This year prepares residents for independent practice by training them to be able to “run the ED” themselves, in addition to encouraging leadership both inside and outside the ED. Patient flow as well as patient metrics are emphasized. Clinically, residents sharpen their acumen in recognizing when patients don’t “fit into a box,” and develop advanced skills in the management of critically ill patients.

Block Schedule

Jackson Memorial Hospital

Holy Cross Hospital

Veterans Affairs Hospital

University of Miami Hospital

PGY1

SITE

EM Orientation

Jackson EM

Holy Cross EM

VA EM

Peds EM

Ryder Trauma/EMS

Orthopedics

Obstetrics

Ultrasound

MICU

Vacation: 4 weeks

1

BLOCKS

1

3

3

1

1

1

1

0.5

0.5

1

PGY2

SITE

Jackson EM

Holy Cross EM

Peds EM

Elective

PICU

Neuro ICU

Ultrasound

CCU

Vacation: 4 weeks

1

BLOCKS

4.5

3

1

1

0.5

0.5

0.5

1

PGY3

SITE

Jackson EM

Holy Cross EM

Toxicology

Peds EM

Ryder Trauma/EMS

UMiami EM

Vacation: 4 weeks

1

BLOCKS

6

3

1

1

1

1

I can’t think of a place I’d rather train to become an emergency medicine doctor. This program has taught me to become a more empathetic physician by taking care of a patient population that truly depends on excellent care that often starts in the ED. Miami has one of the most robust cultures in the world and this diversity has been reflected in my training as well as in my experiences living in this city.

Ryan Lynch, MD

Former Chief Resident